Personal Articles

They’re Playing My Brand: Product Placement in Popular Music

  • Allan, David, (2010) “They’re Playing My Brand: Product Placement in Popular Music,” International Journal of Integrated Marketing Communications, Spring, 40-47.
  • Available: http://www.ijimc.com/

A Content Analysis of Music Placement in Prime-time Television Advertising

Sound Retailing: Music Effects on Shopping Behavior
  • Allan, David (2007), “Sound Retailing: Music Effects on Shopping Behavior,” Bricks and Mortar Shopping in the 21stCentury. ed. Tina Lowry. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates: Mahwah, NJ.
  • Available: www.amazon.com
  • Allan, David (2007), “Sound Advertising: A Review of the Experimental Evidence on the Effects of Music in Commercials on Attention, Memory, Attitudes, and Purchase” Journal of Media Psychology 12 (3).
  • Available:http://www.calstatela.edu/faculty/sfischo/
  • Allan, David (2005), “An Essay on Popular Music in Advertising: Bankruptcy of Culture or Marriage of Art and Commerce,”Advertising and Society 6 (1).
  • Available: www.aef.com
On Popular Music and Advertising
 

Additional Articles

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